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  • Does Torture Prevention Work? (First Part)
    By Richard Carver, Senior Lecturer in Human Rights and Governance, Oxford Brookes University Richard Carver has more than 30 years of experience as a human rights researcher, working for Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, ARTICLE 19, and a number of UN agencies. He has published extensively on national human rights institutions, particularly on criteria and techniques for measuring performance, impact and effectiveness. Originally an Africa specialist, his current work focuses on southeastern Europe. He holds a PhD in Human Rights and an LLM in International Law, both from Oxford Brookes University, where he is Senior Lecturer in Human Rights and Governance.…
  • Why Is Implementation of the Principle of Non-Discrimination within the UN Delayed?
    By Cecilia M. Bailliet, Professor, PluriCourts, Faculty of Law, University of Oslo Cecilia Bailliet is Professor, Director of the Masters Program in Public International Law, and coordinator of International Criminal Law for PluriCourts at the University of Oslo.  She has a doctoral degree in law from the University of Oslo and a combined JD/MA degree from the George Washington University Law School & Elliott School of International Affairs.  Her research addresses the cross-fields of international public law, human rights, women’s law, refugee law, humanitarian law, counter-terrorism, and peace.  Among her publications are Promoting Peace through International Law (co-edited with Kjetil…
  • International Law and Post-Conflict Reconstruction Policy Symposium: Closing Remarks
    By Matthew Saul (University of Oslo) As our blog symposium to mark the publication of International Law and Post-Conflict Reconstruction Policy draws to a close, I will take this opportunity to highlight one particular theme that arises from the discussions and that I think should be central in further research in this area. This is the theme of going deeper. The chapters in the volume are built on a range of vigorous research strategies that combine doctrinal with empirical, which complement each other nicely, and bring to light many useful insights; not least, as we noted on Monday: ‘uncertainty in…
  • International Law and Post-Conflict Reconstruction Policy Symposium: Law and Policy on Post-Conflict Restitution
    By James A Sweeney [James A Sweeney is Professor of International Law at Lancaster University, UK] The idea behind this piece was to use the issue of post-conflict restitution as a particular example of the complex relationship between proclaimed best-practice, emerging international standards, and actual law in post-conflict contexts.  I have written about restitution in my 2012 monograph on the ECHR (now in paperback!), but this chapter was a chance to get deeper into the topic, and also to look at a wider range of international comparative materials (although this brief comment will again concentrate on the European dimension). There…
  • International Law and Post-Conflict Reconstruction Policy Symposium Law and Policy on Post-Conflict Restitution: Response to James Sweeney
    By Anneke Smit [Associate Professor in the Faculty of Law, University of Windsor] In his chapter focussing on property restitution for refugees and IDPs at international law and at the ECtHR, James Sweeney captures effectively the tension between the “generalised ideal” and the “uncomfortable reality” of justice provision in this area. This chapter is a welcome contribution to a growing body of literature critiquing the brightline approach of the Pinheiro Principles, Basic Principles and Guidelines on the Right to a Remedy and Reparation for Victims of Gross Violations of International Human Rights Law and Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law, and…

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