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International Criminal Law Textbooks

By Marthe Kielland Røssaak

Marthe Kielland Røssaak is a research assistant at the Norwegian Centre for Human Rights, while  completing her LLM at the Faculty of Law, University of Oslo. Her research interests include human rights and public international law.

Main Titles

2015-2020

Kevin Heller, Frédéric Mégret, Sarah Nouwen, Jens Ohlin and Darryl Robinson (editors), The Oxford Handbook of International Criminal Law, Oxford University Press (2020).
The Oxford Handbook of International Criminal Law takes a theoretically informed and refreshingly critical look at the most controversial issues in international criminal law, challenging prevailing practices, orthodoxies, and received wisdoms. Some of the contributions to the Handbook come from scholars within the field, but many come from outside of international criminal law, or indeed from outside law itself. The chapters are grounded in history, geography, philosophy, and international relations. The result is a Handbook that expands the discipline and should fundamentally alter how international criminal law is understood.
Link to Publisher ǀ £145.00

Carsten Stahn, A Critical Introduction to International Criminal Law, Cambridge University Press (2018).
Linking discussion of legal theories, case-law and practice to scholarship and opinion, A Critical Introduction to International Criminal Law explores critiques of international criminal law through five main themes at the heart of contemporary dilemmas. These include the shifting contours of criminality and international crimes; the tension between individual and collective responsibility; the challenges of domestic, international, hybrid and regional justice institutions; the foundations of justice procedures; and approaches towards punishment and reparation. The book is suitable for students, academics and professionals from multiple fields wishing to understand contemporary theories, practices and critiques of international criminal law.
Link to Publisher ǀ £24.99

Roger O’Keefe, International Criminal Law, Oxford University Press (2017).
International Criminal Law provides a comprehensive overview of an increasingly integral part of public international law. It complements the usual accounts of the substantive law of those international crimes tried to date before international criminal courts and of the institutional law of those courts with in-depth analyses of fundamental formal juridical concepts such as an ‘international crime’ and an ‘international criminal court’; with detailed examinations of the many international crimes provided for by way of multilateral treaty and of the attendant obligations and rights of states parties; and with sustained attention to the implementation of international criminal law at the national level. Direct, concise, and precise, International Criminal Law should prove a valuable resource for scholars and practitioners of the discipline of international criminal law.
Link to Publisher ǀ £31.49

Douglas Guilfoyle, International Criminal Law, Oxford University Press (2016).
This unique textbook provides an accessible introduction to a fascinating subject area. Written with student needs at its heart, innovative features such as ‘Counterpoint’ and ‘Pause for reflection’ boxes highlight current debates and areas worthy of more detailed analysis, providing students with the tools they need to develop their knowledge and start thinking critically about the law. Learning outcomes open each chapter, and are complemented by closing summaries to further support student understanding. Written by an outstanding scholar and teacher, this user-friendly text offers a unique approach to the subject area, making it the ideal choice for those new to the subject area. This book is also accompanied by a free Online Resource Centre hosting links to key international law documents, additional material on the victims of crime, and updates on important developments within the subject area.
Link to Publisher ǀ £40.99

Kai Ambos, Treatise on International Criminal Law – Volume III: International Criminal Procedure, Oxford University Press (2016).
Since the adoption of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court in 1998, international criminal law has rapidly grown in importance. This three-volume treatise on international criminal law presents a foundational, systematic, consistent, and comprehensive analysis of the field. This third volume offers a comprehensive analysis of the procedures and implementation of international law by international criminal tribunals and the International Criminal Court. Through analysis of the framework of international criminal procedure, the author considers each stage in the process of proceedings before the ICC, including the role of legal participants, the scope of jurisdiction, and the enforcement of sentences.
Link to Publisher ǀ £172.50

Antonio Cassese, Florian JeßbergerRobert Cryer and Urmila Dé (editors), International Criminal Law, Routledge (2015).
International Criminal Law brings together ground-breaking material sourced from a wide range of academic journals, edited collections, textbooks, and monographs, many of which are now hard to obtain. The editors also illuminate the much broader—and fundamental—issues related to impunity, guilt, restitution, and social reconciliation. With a full index and a comprehensive introduction, International Criminal Law is an essential, authoritative, and accessible work of reference for scholar, student, and practitioner alike.
Link to Publisher ǀ £968.00

Other Relevant Titles by Year

2015

Carsten Stahn, The Law and Practice of the International Criminal Court, Oxford University Press (2015).
The International Criminal Court is a controversial and important body within international law; one that is significantly growing in importance, particularly as other international criminal tribunals close down. After a decade of Court practice, this book takes stock of the activities of the International Criminal Court, identifying the key issues in need of re-thinking or potential reform. It provides a systematic and in-depth thematic account of the law and practice of the Court, including its changes context, the challenges it faces, and its overall contribution to international criminal law. The book is written by over forty leading practitioners and scholars from both inside and outside the Court. They provide an unparallelled insight into the Court as an institution, its jurisprudence, the impact of its activities, and its future development. This book will be essential reading for practitioners, scholars, and students of international criminal law.
Link to Publisher ǀ £262.50

Andrew Novak, The International Criminal Court – An Introduction, Springer Publishing (2015).
The book explores the historical development of international criminal law and the formal legal structure created by the Rome Statute, against the background of the Court’s search for objectivity in a political global environment. The book reviews the operations of the Court in practice and the Court’s position in the power politics of the international system. It discusses and clarifies all stages of an international criminal proceeding from the opening of the investigation to sentencing, reparations, and final appeals in the context of its restorative justice mission. Making appropriate comparisons and contrasts between the international criminal justice system and domestic and national systems, the book fills a gap in international criminal justice study.
Link to Publisher ǀ €32.09

Hilmi M. Zawati, Fair Labelling and the Dilemma of Prosecuting Gender-Based Crimes at the International Criminal Tribunals, Oxford University Press (2015).
This scholarly legal work focuses on the dilemma of prosecuting gender-based crimes under the statutes of the international criminal tribunals with reference to the principle of fair labelling. It is the first legal analysis to focus on the dilemma of prosecuting and punishing wartime gender-based crimes in the statutory laws of the international criminal tribunals and the ICC in the context of fair labelling. Moreover, it emphasizes that applying fair labelling to wartime gender-based crimes would enable the tribunals and the ICC to deliver fair judgments, eliminate inconsistent prosecution, overcome shortcomings in addressing gender-based crimes within their jurisprudence, while breaking the cycle of impunity for these crimes.
Link to Publisher ǀ £33.99

Gerhard Kemp, Individual Criminal Liability for the International Crime of Aggression, 2nd Edition, Intersentia (2015).
The book contains an overview and discussion of the historical and normative processes (legal and political) that culminated in the adoption of the Kampala Resolution on the Crime of Aggression. The different components of the resolution are critically assessed against the background of the various political and legal responses to aggression, while taking into account contemporary developments in the field of international criminal law. The volume is primarily but not exclusively concerned with the crime of aggression under the Rome Statute. It also includes a chapter on national and regional criminal justice responses to aggression, notably developments concerning the amendments to the Protocol on the Statute of the African Court of Justice and Human Rights, which also provides for the criminalisation of aggression.
Link to Publisher ǀ €75.00

Karel De Meester, The Investigation Phase in International Criminal Procedure, Intersentia (2015).
The number of academic writings on international criminal procedure is growing rapidly. Nevertheless, the investigation phase has so far received less attention than the trial phase itself. The importance of investigative actions for the further proceedings is not yet reflected to the full extent in academic writings on international criminal proceedings. This book seeks to cover this gap. It examines the existing law and practice of the different international(ised) criminal courts and tribunals with regard to the conduct of investigations in order to identify any (emerging) rules of international criminal procedure. More precisely, it enquires whether, notwithstanding their nature of ‘self-contained regimes’, these institutions have adopted certain common rules. Additionally, it aims to examine the fairness of the law and practice of the different international(ised) criminal courts and tribunals with regard to the conduct of investigations.
Link to Publisher ǀ €149.00

2016

William A. Schabas, The International Criminal Court – A Commentary on the Rome Statute, Oxford University Press (2016).
Established as one of the main sources for the study of the Rome Statute, this volume provides an article-by-article analysis of the Statute; the detailed analysis draws upon relevant case law from the Court itself, as well as from other international and national criminal tribunals, academic commentary, and related instruments such as the Elements of Crimes, the Rules of Procedure and Evidence, and the Relationship Agreement with the United Nations. Each of the 128 articles is accompanied by an overview of the drafting history as well as a bibliography of academic literature relevant to the provision. Written by a single author, the Commentary avoids duplication and inconsistency, providing a comprehensive presentation to assist those who must understand, interpret, and apply the complex provisions of the Rome Statute.
Link to Publisher ǀ £250.00

Linda E. Carter, Mark S. Ellis and Charles Chernor Jalloh, The International Criminal Court in an Effective Global Justice System, Edward Elgar Publishing (2016).
This book analyses the interactions of international criminal tribunals established since the 1990s with international, national and regional bodies, making recommendations for the International Criminal Court (ICC) as it goes forward. Placing the core issues within the statutory framework of the Rome Statute and major policy considerations, the authors examine ways in which the ICC can best coordinate with other accountability mechanisms on national and regional prosecutions, the UN Security Council, cooperation on the enforcement of arrest warrants, national non-judicial processes and amicus briefs from non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Lawyers, judges, NGOs, government officials, academics and policymakers at all levels will value this book as an important resource on transitional justice and the place of justice in the aftermath of conflict and mass atrocity.
Link to Publisher ǀ £105.00

Valsamis Mitsilegas, Maria Bergström and Theodore Konstadinides (editors), Research Handbook on EU Criminal Law, Edward Elgar Publishing (2016).
EU criminal law is one of the fastest evolving, but also challenging, policy areas and fields of law. This Handbook provides a comprehensive and advanced analysis of EU criminal law as a structurally and constitutionally unique policy area and field of research. With contributions from leading experts, focusing on their respective fields of research, the book is preoccupied with defining cross-border or ‘Euro-crimes’, while allowing Member States to sanction criminal behaviour through mutual cooperation. It contains a web of institutions, agencies and external liaisons, which ensure the protection of EU citizens from serious crime, while protecting the fundamental rights of suspects and criminals. Students and scholars of EU criminal law will benefit from the comprehensive research present in this Handbook.
Link to Publisher ǀ £238.00

Marina Aksenova, Complicity in International Criminal Law, Hart Publishing (2016).
This book tackles one of the most contentious aspects of international criminal law – the modes of liability. The principle of legality demands that there exists a well-defined link between the crime and the person charged with it. This is so even in the context of international offending, which often implies ‘several degrees of separation’ between the direct perpetrator and the person who authorises the atrocity. The challenge is to construct that link without jeopardising the interests of justice. This monograph provides the first comprehensive treatment of complicity within the discipline and beyond. The book exposes problems with the sources of law and demonstrates the absence of clearly defined sentencing and policy rationales, which are crucial tools in structuring judicial discretion. The book was awarded The Paul Guggenheim Prize in International Law 2017.
Link to Publisher ǀ £65.00

Claus Kress and Stefan Barriga (editors), The Crime of Aggression – A Commentary, Cambridge University Press (2016).
This landmark commentary provides the first analysis of the history, theory, legal interpretation and future of the crime of aggression. As well as explaining the positions of the main actors in the negotiations, the authoritative team of leading scholars and practitioners set out exactly how countries have themselves criminalized illegal war-making in domestic law and practice. In light of the anticipated activation of the Court’s jurisdiction over this crime in 2017, this work offers, over two volumes, a comprehensive legal analysis of how to understand the material and mental elements of the crime of aggression as defined at Kampala. Alongside The Travaux Préparatoires of the Crime of Aggression (Cambridge, 2011), this commentary provides the definitive resource for anyone concerned with the illegal use of force.
Link to Publisher ǀ £65.00

Róisín Mulgrew and Denis Abels (editors), Research Handbook on the International Penal System, Edward Elgar Publishing (2016).
The Research Handbook on the International Penal System critically analyses the laws, policies and practices that govern detention, punishment and the enforcement of sentences in the international criminal justice context. Comprehensive and innovative, it examines the operation of the international penal system, covering pertinent issues such as non-custodial sanctions, monitoring of conditions of detention, the protection of prisoners under international law and the transfer of prisoners. These aspects are presented in a logical order, linking up with the chronological sequence of the international criminal justice process. This up-to-date assessment will provide valuable insights for researchers and students of international criminal law and justice, comparative penal law, penology, prisoners’ rights and transitional and restorative justice.
Link to Publisher ǀ £48.00

2017

Charles Chernor Jalloh and Ilias Bantekas (editors), The International Criminal Court and Africa, Oxford University Press (2017).
This book analyses the relationship and tensions between the International Criminal Court (ICC) and Africa. It traces the origins of the confrontation between African governments, both acting individually and within the framework of the African Union, and the permanent Hague-based ICC. Leading commentators offer valuable insights on the core legal and political issues that have confused the relationship between the two sides and expose the uneasy interaction between international law and international politics. They offer suggestions on how best to continue the fight against impunity, using national, ICC, and regional justice mechanisms, while taking into principled account the views and interests of African States.
Link to Publisher ǀ £84.00

Helmut Satzger, International and European Criminal Law, 2nd Edition, Hart Publishing (2017).
In the wake of increasing globalisation, criminal law has become an internationalised subject. This revised and updated second edition highlights the most important aspects of European and international criminal law in order to provide the reader with a comprehensive, concise and solid introduction to this modern field of law.

The book focuses on the exercise of jurisdiction, principles of international criminal law, procedures and substantive law of the ICC, ne bis in idem-principle, evolutions of European Criminal Procedure Law and guarantees under the ECHR.
Link to Publisher ǀ £100.00

Mohammad Hadi Zakerhossein, Situation Selection Regime at the International Criminal Court, Intersentia (2017).
The International Criminal Court (the Court) in The Hague, in fulfilling its mandate to put an end to impunity for the perpetrators of the most serious international crimes of concern to the international community as a whole, is neither able nor intended to investigate all situations of crisis across the world. This book studies the situation selection regime at the International Criminal Court. In doing so, it first clarifies the notion of situation under the constituent instrument of the Court, the Rome Statute. In addition to this conceptualization, through describing the situation selection process and criteria, the Court’s law, policies and practices in this regard are examined. Dealing with the misunderstanding of the Court’s selectivity, this book reads the situation selection regime from the lens of expressivism. This theory justifies the selectivity in the Court’s operation. The book is a resource for anyone who seeks more insight into the situation selection regime of the Court.
Link to Publisher ǀ €95.00

2018

Gabriel M. Lenter, The UN Security Council and the International Criminal Court, Edward Elgar Publishing (2018).
Drawing on both theory and practice, this insightful book offers a comprehensive analysis of the relationship between the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) and the International Criminal Court (ICC), centred on the referral mechanism. Arguing that the legal nature of the referral must be conceptualized as a conferral of powers from the UNSC to the ICC, the author explores the complex legal relationship between interacting international organizations. Lentner explores issues regarding any limits and conditions for referral under the UN Charter and the Rome Statute, and the legal effects on heads-of-state immunity, as well as the validity of jurisdictional exemptions for other specific categories of nationals. With its timely focus on an important topic, this book will be vital reading for academics in international institutional law, international criminal law, and human rights law.
Link to Publisher ǀ £80.00

Joanna Nicholson, Fighting and Victimhood in International Criminal Law, Routledge (2018).
The act of fighting or being a fighter has certain consequences in international law. The most obvious example can be found in international humanitarian law, where a distinction is drawn between fighters and civilians, with fighters being military objectives and civilians being protected from attack. Another example is from international human rights law, where it has been held that the particular characteristics of military life have to be taken into account when interpreting the human rights of members of state armed forces. This volume focuses on the field of international criminal law and asks the question: what relevance does fighting have to victimhood in international criminal law? The author carries out an in-depth exploration of case law from international criminal courts and tribunals to assess how they have dealt with such questions. She concludes that the import of fighting upon victimhood in the context of international criminal law has not always been appreciated to the extent it should have been.
Link to Publisher ǀ £29.59

Kai Ambos, European Criminal Law, Cambridge University Press (2018).
European Criminal Law offers a compelling insight into the development and functions of European criminal law. It tracks the historical development of European criminal law, offering a detailed critical analysis of the criminal justice systems responsible for its implementation. With its close analysis of secondary legislation and reliance on a wide variety of original sources, this book provides a thorough understanding of European Criminal Law and the institutions involved.
Link to Publisher ǀ £32.99

2019

Guénaël Mettraux, International Crimes: Law and Practice – Volume I: Genocide, Oxford University Press (2019).
Judge Mettraux’s four-volume compendium, International Crimes: Law and Practice, will provide the most detailed and authoritative account to-date of the law of international crimes. It is a scholarly tour de force providing a unique blend of academic rigour and an insight into the practice of international criminal law. The compendium is un-rivalled in its breadth and depth, covering almost a century of legal practice, dozens of jurisdictions (national and international), thousands of decisions and judgments and hundreds of cases. This first volume discusses in detail the law of genocide: its definition, elements, normative status, and relationship to the other core international crimes. While the book is an invaluable tool for academics and researchers, it is particularly suited to legal practitioners, guiding the reader through the practical and evidential challenges associated with the prosecution of international crimes.
Link to Publisher ǀ £125.00

Robert Cryer (editor), International Criminal Law Documents, Cambridge University press (2019).
This carefully edited text collects the major documents on International Criminal Law, through the early practice after the First World War, the Nuremberg and Tokyo International Military Tribunals up to the present. It includes the statutes of the ad hoc Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda, as well as the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court and its associated documents, including the elements of crimes that were adopted to assist the Court, and its Rules of Procedure and Evidence. The book also includes the main treaty provisions that provide the basis of the subject. Edited by a specialist in the field with more than twenty years’ experience of teaching international criminal law, this book is designed for practical use by students and practitioners. For students it is ideal as a companion for both study and examination.
Link to Publisher ǀ £19.99  

George P. Fletcher, The Grammar of Criminal Law – Volume II: International Criminal Law, Oxford University Press (2019).
To understand the international legal order in the field of criminal law, we need to ask three elementary questions. What is international law? What is criminal law? And what happens to these two fields when they are joined together? Volume Two of The Grammar of Criminal Law sets out to answer these questions through a series of twelve dichotomies – such as law vs. justice, intention vs. negligence, and causation vs. background events – that invite the reader to better understand the jurisprudential foundations of international criminal law. The book will be of interest to students, scholars, and policymakers around the world.
Link to Publisher ǀ £64.00

Errol P Mendes, Peace and Justice at the International Criminal Court, 2nd Edition, Edward Elgar Publishing (2019).
Peace and Justice at the International Criminal Court focuses on the evolution and the present-day work of the International Criminal Court, a historic global institution. The author dives deep into the facts and rulings of the Court that involved some of the most serious international conflicts in recent times. The author also discusses the challenges facing the Court from failed prosecutions to failures of the UN Security Council and other member states. What results is a detailed but honest critique of where the Court succeeds and where it needs to improve. Mendes goes on to provide a prediction of the greatest challenges facing the Court in the foreseeable future. This book is a valuable resource for academics and students in international criminal law and practice, public international relations, political science, military and war studies.
Link to Publisher ǀ £80.00

Victor Tsilonis, The Jurisdiction of the International Criminal Court, Springer Publishing (2019).
The book provides a holistic examination of the jurisdiction of the International Criminal Court (ICC). The main focus is placed on the three pillars which form the ICC’s foundation pursuant to the Rome Statute: the preconditions to the exercise of its jurisdiction (Article 12 Rome Statute); the substantive competence, i.e. the core crimes (Article 5-8bis Rome Statute, i.e. genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, crime of aggression); and the principle of complementarity (Article 17§1 (a) Rome Statute). Finally yet importantly, the main ‘negative preconditions’ for the Court’s jurisdiction, i.e. immunities (Article 27 Rome Statute) and exceptions via Security Council referrals are thoroughly examined. The book is an excellent resource for scholars as well as practitioners and notably contributes to the existing literature.
Link to Publisher ǀ €92.29

Jérôme de Hemptinne, Robert Roth and Elies van Sliedregt (editors), Modes of Liability in International Criminal Law, Cambridge University Press (2019).
Presently, many of the greatest debates and controversies in international criminal law concern modes of liability for international crimes. The present book aims at clarifying the state of the law and provides a thorough analysis of the jurisprudence of international courts and tribunals, as well as of the debates and the questions these debates have left open. Renowned international criminal law scholars analyze, in discrete chapters, the modes of liability one by one; for each mode they identify the main trends in the jurisprudence and the main points of controversy. An introduction addresses the cross-cutting issues, and a conclusion anticipates possible evolutions that we may see in the future.
Link to Publisher ǀ £125.00

Drazan Djukić, The Right to Appeal in International Criminal Law, Brill Nijhoff Publishing (2019).
In The Right to Appeal in International Criminal Law Djukić describes appeal proceedings in international criminal law and evaluates them against human rights benchmarks. While international criminal courts and tribunals mainly comply with these benchmarks, they have fallen short in certain important areas. 
Despite their importance to the legal process, appeal proceedings tend to receive limited attention. On the basis of benchmarks arising from international human rights law, Djukić systematically assesses the law and practice concerning appeal proceedings in international criminal law. 
Link to Publisher ǀ €130.00

Ottavio Quirico, International ‘Criminal’ Responsibility, Routledge (2019).
In the course of the 20th and 21st centuries, major offences committed by individuals have been subject to progressive systematisation in the framework of international criminal law. Through a critical analysis of key international rules, the book assesses whether the divisive approach to individual and State responsibility is normatively consistent. Contemporary situations, such as the humanitarian crises in Syria and Libya, 9/11 and the Iraq wars demonstrate that the matter still gives rise to controversy: a set of systemic problems emerge. The research focuses on the substantive elements of major offences, notably agression, genocide, core war crimes, core crimes against humanity and terrorism, as well as relevant procedural implications. The book is a useful resource for practitioners, policymakers, academics, students, researchers and anyone interested in international law and politics.
Link to Publisher ǀ £96.00

Carola Lingaas, The Concept of Race in International Criminal Law, Routledge (2019).
Members of racial groups are protected under international law against genocide, persecution, and apartheid. But what is race – and why was this contentious term not discussed when drafting the Statute of the International Criminal Court? This book is the first comprehensive study of the concept of race in international criminal law. It explores the theoretical underpinnings for the crimes of genocide, apartheid, and persecution, and analyses all the relevant legal instruments, case law, and scholarship. It exposes how the international criminal tribunals have largely circumvented the topic of race, and how incoherent jurisprudence has resulted in inconsistent protection. It will be of interest to students and practitioners of international criminal law, as well as those studying genocide, apartheid, and race in domestic and international law.
Link to Publisher ǀ £96.00

Predrag Dojčinović, Propaganda and International Criminal Law, Routledge (2019).
This book addresses the conceptual and evidentiary issues relating to the treatment of propaganda in international criminal law. Bringing together an interdisciplinary range of scholars, researchers and legal practitioners from Africa, Australia, Europe and the United States, the book provides an in-depth analysis of the nature, position and role of the concept of propaganda in mass atrocity crimes trials. This book is the first to synthesize the knowledge, procedures and methods of international criminal law with the social cognitive sciences. Including a comprehensive overview of the most relevant case law, jurisprudence and scientific studies, the book also offers a series of practical insights and strategies for both academics and legal professionals. An invaluable resource for those working in the area of international criminal law.
Link to Publisher ǀ £92.00

Anna Marie Brennan, Transnational Terrorist Groups and International Criminal Law, Routledge (2019).
This book critically examines the limits of international criminal law in bringing members of transnational terrorist groups to justice in the context of changing methods of warfare, drawing from human rights, sociology, and best practices in international criminal justice. Drawing on organisational network theory, Anna Marie Brennan explores the nature of international crimes and assesses the potential for the International Criminal Court to prosecute and investigate alleged crimes perpetrated by members of transnational terrorist groups, paying particular attention to their modus operandi and organisational structure. In advancing an innovative perspective on the accountability of members of transnational terrorist groups, and in offering solutions to current challenges, the book will be of great interest and use to academic, practitioners, and students engaged in the study of terrorism, the ICC, or international humanitarian law.
Link to Publisher ǀ £29.59

2020

Robert Cryer, Darryl Robinson and Sergey Vasiliev, An Introduction to International Criminal Law and Procedure, 4th Edition, Cambridge University Press (2019).
Written by a team of international lawyers with extensive academic and practical experience of international criminal law, the fourth edition of this leading textbook offers readers comprehensive coverage and a high level of academic rigour while maintaining its signature accessible and engaging style. Introducing the readers to the fundamental concepts of international criminal law, as well as the domestic and international institutions that enforce that law, this book engages with critical questions, political and moral challenges, and alternatives to international justice. Suitable for undergraduate and postgraduate students, academics and practitioners in the field. Cited by the International Criminal Tribunal for Yugoslavia, the ICC, the Special Court for Sierra Leone, the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia, and the highest courts in domestic systems, this book is a must-read for anyone interested in learning more about international criminal law.
Link to Publisher ǀ £39.99

Andreas Zimmermann and Elisa Freiburg (editors), Aggression under the Rome Statute, Hart Publishing (2020).
This book aims to offer an in-depth analysis of the crime of aggression as covered by the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. Starting from the legal history of its inclusion in 2010, it analyses the relevant articles 8bis, 15bis and 15ter of the Rome Statute – covering the definition of the crime of aggression, the exercise of jurisdiction over the crime of aggression through State referrals and the proprio motu powers of the ICC Prosecutor, and the exercise of jurisdiction over the crime of aggression through UN Security Council referrals. Likewise, the book covers upcoming developments on the crime of aggression and the ICC post-2017. It addresses the various challenges towards activating the Court’s jurisdiction, in particular, the necessary vote required for activation, as well as the significant challenges faced by the three ways in which the Court may exercise such jurisdiction.
Link to Publisher ǀ £170.00

Guénaël Mettraux, International Crimes: Law and Practice – Volume II: Crimes Against Humanity, Oxford University Press (2020).
Judge Mettraux’s four-volume compendium, International Crimes: Law and Practice, will provide the most detailed and authoritative account to-date of the law of international crimes. It is a scholarly tour de force providing a unique blend of academic rigour and an insight into the practice of international criminal law. The compendium is un-rivalled in its breadth and depth, covering almost a century of legal practice, dozens of jurisdictions (national and international), thousands of decisions and judgments and hundreds of cases. This second volume discusses in detail crimes against humanity.
Link to Publisher ǀ £175.00

William A. Schabas, An Introduction to the International Criminal Court, 6th Edition, Cambridge University Press (2019).
This is the authoritative introduction to the International Criminal Court, fully updated in this sixth edition. The book covers the legal framework of the Court, the cases that it has heard and that are still to come, and the political debates surrounding its operation. The sixth edition brings legal references fully up to date in light of the Court’s case law. Several trials have now been completed, with four convictions and a number of controversial acquittals. The book also discusses the situations that the Court is currently investigating, including Palestine, Georgia, Ukraine, Venezuela and the UK in Iraq. It also looks into the crisis with African states and the hostility of the United States to the institution.
Link to Publisher ǀ £37.99

Juan Pablo Perez-Leon-Acevedo and Joanna Nicholson (editors), Defendants and Victims in International Criminal Justice, Routledge (2020).
This volume considers a variety of key issues pertaining to the rights of defendants and victims at International Criminal Courts (ICTs) and explores how best to balance and enhance the rights of both in order to ensure the effectiveness and efficiency of international criminal proceedings. This book provides analyses of issues on the rights of both the accused and the victims. While most of the chapters focus mainly on either the accused or the victims, others discuss both at the same time. The work strikes a fine balance between, on the one hand, classic topics on the rights of the accused and the rights of the victims and, on the other, topics which have been largely unexplored and/or which require new angles or perspectives. Additionally, there are some chapters which approach both the rights of the accused and the rights of the victims in new contexts and/or under novel perspectives. The work will be an essential resource for academics, practitioners and students with an interest in the field of international criminal law.
Link to Publisher ǀ £96.00

FORTHCOMING

2020

Gerhard Werle and Florian Jessberger (editors), Principles of International Criminal Law, 4th Edition, Oxford University Press (2020).
Principles of International Criminal Law is one of the most influential textbooks in the field of international criminal justice. This fourth edition builds on the highly successful work of the previous editions, setting out the general principles governing international crimes as well as the fundamentals of both substantive and procedural international criminal law. The book assesses in detail the four key international crimes as defined by the statute of the International Criminal Court: genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and the crime of aggression. The new edition includes substantial new material on critical perspectives on international criminal justice, the fragmentation of international criminal law, new war crimes of prohibited means of warfare, and the prosecution of crimes committed in Syria and Northern Iraq. The book retains its highly acclaimed systematic approach and consistent methodology, making it essential reading for both students and scholars of international criminal law, as well as practitioners and judges working in the field.
Link to Publisher ǀ £49.99

Monique Cornier, The Jurisdiction of the International Criminal Court over Nationals of Non-State Parties, Cambridge University Press (2020).
This book provides a systematic and comprehensive analysis of the ICC’s jurisdiction over nationals of non-States Parties. It is within the context of developments at the Court in recent years that this work addresses the overarching question: On what legal basis is the ICC authorised to exercise jurisdiction over nationals of non-States Parties? The book explains and applies the concept of delegated jurisdiction as a legal basis for the ICC’s jurisdiction over nationals of non-States Parties. Cornier uses actual examples of situations considered by the Court to explore the legal basis possibilities, and applies and critiques relevant ICC decisions, providing a useful resource for legal practitioners and academic commentators.
Link to Publisher ǀ £85.00  

Anni Pues, Prosecutorial Discretion at the International Criminal Court, Hart Publishing (2020).
This timely book provides a comprehensive guide to, and rigorous analysis of, prosecutorial discretion at the International Criminal Court. This is the first ever study that takes the reader through all the key stages of the Prosecutor’s decision-making process. Starting from preliminary examinations and the decision to investigate, the book also explores case selection processes, plea agreements, culminating in the question of how to end engagement in specific country situations. The book serves as a guide to the Rome Statute through the lens of the Prosecutor’s activities. The book will be of interest to students, practitioners of law, academics, and the wider public concerned with international law, criminal justice and international relations.
Link to Publisher ǀ £75.00

2021

Kai Ambos, Alexander Heinze and Philipp Ambach (editors), Evidence in International Criminal Procedure – A Commentary, Hart Publishing (2021).
This commentary brings together the relevant body of law on evidence at international criminal courts and tribunals and provides both a detailed description and analysis thereof. This includes a critical assessment of differing approaches across the institutions as well as jurisprudential trends and developments. It therefore serves as a comprehensive guide to the law on evidence and international criminal procedures for practitioners and scholars alike.
Link to Publisher ǀ £350.00

2023

Henning Glaser (editor), The Protection of Human Rights through International Law and International Criminal Law, Springer Publishing (2023).
This Work deals with chances and boundaries of the protection of Human Rights through International Law and International Criminal Law. It contains contributions by leading legal scholars and experts from all over the world and provides positive as well as sceptical attitudes.
Link to Publisher ǀ €139.99

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