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Twelfth Summer Session of Salzburg Law School on International Criminal Law, Humanitarian Law and Human Rights Law

The Salzburg Law School on International Criminal Law, Humanitarian Law and Human Rights Law (SLS) welcomes applications for its Twelfth Summer Session, under the title “Handling the results of the first Review Conference – Success and failures equally obliging to continue consolidating and amending international criminal law and its enforcement mechanisms”, Sunday 8 to Friday 20 August 2010.

For further details on the academic programme and the application process see www.salzburglawschool.com.

Complete call for application, including the draft academic programme:

Salzburg Law School on International Criminal Law, Humanitarian Law and Human Rights Law

Twelfth Summer Session, Sunday 8 to Friday 20 August 2010

Handling the results of the first Review Conference – Success and failures equally obliging to continue consolidating and amending international criminal law and its enforcement mechanisms

Call for Applications

The Salzburg Law School on International Criminal Law, Humanitarian Law and Human Rights Law (SLS) welcomes applications for its Twelfth Summer Session, Sunday 8 to Friday 20 August 2010. This year’s Session will be dedicated to evaluating the proceedings and results of the First Review Conference of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC) to be held in Kampala, Uganda, in June 2010.

The statutorily prescribed First Review Conference (Article 123 Rome Statute) will deal with a limited number of amendment proposals, all related to the crimes within the jurisdiction of the ICC. Next to the deletion of Article 124 Rome Statute’s transitional provision granting state parties an opportunity to temporarily reject the Court’s jurisdiction over war crimes and the inclusion of the use of certain weapons as a war crime in the context of an armed conflict not of an international character, the major substantive issue on the agenda is the crime of aggression. Will the Review Conference, twelve years after confirming the crime of aggression as one of the most serious crimes of concern to the international community as a whole, succeed in adopting a provision enabling the Court to exercise its jurisdiction over this crime? The Assembly of States Parties has made remarkable progress arriving at a broadly accepted definition and elements of the crime of aggression. However, determining the conditions for the exercise of jurisdiction may remain a key obstacle.

Next to considering amendments to the Rome Statute, the Review Conference will take stock of the status of international criminal justice concentrating on the principle of complementarity, cooperation, the impact of the Rome Statute system on victims and affected communities as well as peace and justice. The Salzburg Law School will critically assess the outcome of the discussions of these four thematic clusters with a view to the need of consolidating and further develop international criminal law.

In addition, Salzburg Law School will provide an opportunity to debate current developments in the field of international criminal law, i.a. aspects related to ICC Pre-Trial Chamber II’s “Decision Pursuant to Article 15 of the Rome Statute on the Authorization of an Investigation into the Situation in the Republic of Kenya”, including the proprio motu powers of the Prosecutor under the Rome Statute, the “State or organizational policy” element of crimes against humanity and admissibility issues affecting future cases. A further emphasis will be put on Bangaldesh’s efforts to secure accountability for crimes under international law committed during the 1971 independence war. The 111th state party to the Rome Statute has recently revised its 1973 war crimes act and set up a war crimes tribunal. Evaluations of the work of the ICTY and the ICTR, as well as their completion strategy, updates on the activities of the UN Special Tribunal for Lebanon and on the initiative for a comprehensive convention on crimes against humanity as well as a practical pleading exercise will round off the programme.

Speakers of the Twelfth Session will be distinguished scholars and practitioners in the field of international criminal law. Among them, Prof. M. Cherif Bassiouni, Distinguished Research Professor of Law and President, International Human Rights Law Institute, DePaul University College of Law; President, International Institute of Higher Studies in Criminal Sciences; Honorary President, International Association of Penal Law (Key-note Speaker); Gilbert Bitti, Senior Legal Advisor, International Criminal Court; René Blattmann, Judge, International Criminal Court; Prof. Roger Clark, Board of Governors Professor, Rutgers University School of Law; Dr. David Donat Cattin, Director, International Law and Human Rights Programme, Parliamentarians for Global Action; Prof. Benjamin Ferencz, A former Nuremberg War Crimes Prosecutor and frequent lecturer on international criminal courts and world peace; Gillian Higgins, Defence Counsel in international criminal cases; Steven Kay QC, Defence Counsel ininternational criminal cases; Suzannah Linton, Associate Professor of Law, University of Hong Kong; Daniel N. Nsereko, Judge and President of the Appeals Division, International Criminal Court, Professor of Law, University of Botswana, Gaberone; Alphonse Orie, Judge, International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia; Prof. William A. Schabas OC MRIA, Director, Irish Centre for Human Rights, National University of Ireland, Galway;  Jarinde Temminck Tuinstra, Lecturer in Criminal Law, University of Amsterdam; Prof. Otto Triffterer, Professor of Austrian and International Criminal Law, University of Salzburg; Astrid Reisinger Coracini, Lecturer, Institute of International Law and International Relations, University of Graz.

The academic programme runs Monday 9 through Thursday 19 August, daily from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2.30 p.m. to 5.30 p.m. with a free week-end. The course consists of lectures, work-shops and case studies and will be held at the University of Salzburg, Faculty of Law, a 16th-century residence located in the centre of the old town. Each presentation will be followed by an extensive discussion, chaired by Prof. Triffterer.

Participants will obtain a certificate of attendance, but may also take an exam for which 4 credits according to the European Credit Transfer System are available.

To apply, please fill in our online application form at <http://www.salzburglaw­school.com/­application.html> and send your CV together with a letter of motivation latest until 12 May 2010.

For further information, visit <www.salzburglawschool.com> or contact <astrid.reisinger@sbg.ac.at> a

3 Comments

  1. Tejman Shrestha Tejman Shrestha 17 May 2010

    This programme seems very much useful to the human rights defenders who have zeal for working on human rights and justice.

  2. Tejman Shrestha Tejman Shrestha 17 May 2010

    This programme is very much useful to the students, scholars and human rights defenders who fight for justice. I hope it contributes in resolving the conflict by providing energies to such people and make them competent in their profession.

  3. Bafaki Charles Bafaki Charles 28 April 2011

    I wanted to apply for the Twelfth Summer Session of 8th – 20th August but the website for application is not opening what do i do
    Thanks
    Bafaki

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