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In Memoriam: Kaiyan Homi Kaikobad

This post is authored by Dr Elena Katselli and Dr Zeray Yihdego.

Professor Kaiyan Homi Kaikobad: A Tribute to a Great Professor and a Wonderful Human Being

On July 1, 2010, Professor Kaiyan Homi Kaikobad, formerly at Durham University and most recently at Brunel University, passed away leaving an irreplaceable void. Not only was he a great Professor of International Law who made significant contributions and who shared his passion, knowledge and wisdom in the field with everyone around him, but he was also a Humanist, a reliable Friend, a Gentleman, and a wonderful Human Being.

As his students, we enjoyed his continuous support and encouragement throughout the years, his humbleness, and the broadness of his spirit. However, his premature death has not left us an opportunity to show him our appreciation and admiration, and how much he influenced our lives in so many positive ways.

Professor Kaikobad’s example will always inspire us and will always enlighten our hearts. He will be greatly missed but he will certainly not be forgotten.

Elena Katselli and Zeray Yihdego

9 Comments

  1. Aurel Sari Aurel Sari 10 July 2010

    This is sad news indeed. Professor Kaikobad was an inspiring teacher. He was most generous with his time, always ready to engage in discussions with his students and to share his knowlegde and wisdom.
    Aurel Sari

  2. Nena Plummer Nena Plummer 19 July 2010

    I am shocked and devastated by this news. Professor Kaikobad was one of the most encouraging and committed lectureres I have ever had, and I feel honoured to have had him as a teacher. He was highly passionate about international law and this was evident in his teaching and the time and effort he put into his students. He will be greatly missed.
    Nena Plummer

  3. Nena Plummer Nena Plummer 19 July 2010

    I am shocked and devastated by this news. Professor Kaikobad was one of the most encouraging and committed lecturers I have ever had, and I feel honoured to have had him as a teacher. He was highly passionate about international law and this was evident in his teaching and the time and effort he put into his students. He will be greatly missed.
    Nena Plummer

  4. Claudia Claudia 30 July 2010

    This is a very sad news. Prof Kaikobad was one of the nicest, supportive person I’ve ever met. He was so gentle and humble and so knowledgable….this is a very sad loss. I hope he is now in a better place.
    He will be greatly missed on a human and academic level.
    Thanks Prof Kaikobad for being the person you have been.
    Claudia Masoni

  5. Tecola W. Hagos Tecola W. Hagos 16 September 2010

    As a student of International Law and Jurisprudence for over thirty years, I have read countless articles and books on those subjects. I had the great privilege to read almost all of the great books written by Professor Kaikobad, the most recent being his monumental work, INTERPRETATION AND REVISION OF INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY DECISIONS (Cambridge, 2007). His passing away is a great shock to me, for I had hoped and planned to visit with him. I am not his student, nor have met him ever, unfortunately. I can say without hesitation his work is among the finest writings in international law, especially his last book is unmatched by any. All those who want to learn great insight and wisdom in countering the mess international tribunals and forums have made of territorial and boundary disputes must read this unique book, for it is the only comprehensive scholarly work on that badly handled and serious question on territorial and boundary conflicts. May I express my sorrow to Professor Kaikobad family that includes his students and his admirers even those like me from a far. Requiem eternum. Tecola W. Hagos

  6. Jonathan Brenner Jonathan Brenner 26 November 2010

    Dr. Kaikobad was my inspiration for getting involved in law. I attended his course in and MA Program for International Boundaries at Durham in 2000-2001. After 10 years, I am entering law school so hopefully one day I can use the knowledge passed forth from this great man to help solve disputes around the world.
    Bless your heart

  7. Anonymous Anonymous 27 March 2011

    Professor Kaikobad was my supervisor during my Masters course at Brunel University and I must say he was an amazying teacher with a great personality. I feel extremely sad for the fact that I had not had a chance to personally thank him for his time and effort to educate me and elevate my knowledge. I was convinced that I would have the chance to speak to him again during my graduation and thank him as he deserves. On the day of my graduation I found out about the terrible news, and the day definitely was not so cheerful. I was unpleasantly astonished that during the graduation ceremony at Brunel University no one has not once mentioned the Professor Kaikobad!!! Whist they kept talking about some less known people and their less known innovations. Such an ugly event and for that I can not forgive Brunel University. With Mr. Kaikobad’s death the University has lost a lot..
    With all my respect for Mr. Kaikobad,
    his sencere dissertation student, Katarina Nikolic

  8. Ali Ali 9 November 2011

    Professor Kaikobad was indubitably a brilliant scholar of law. I had the priviledge to meet him in Pakistan in 2006. He was originally from Pakistan. It was there he passed the LL.B and became a lawyer. He was from a noble Parsi family and even his father was a lawyer at Rawalpindi, Pakistan. May his soul rest in eternal peace.
    Ali Murtaza Advocate

  9. Abu Reza Abu Reza 19 March 2012

    I am greatly saddened to learn about the demise of Prof Kaikobad and even more shocked to know that he passed away almost two years ago. Only this week I was thinking of contacting him! I have known Prof Kaikobad or Khaiyan (as I used to call him although he was lot older than me) since the time when I was doing my Masters in Law at the London School of Economics (LSE). At that time Khaiyan had already done his PhD from LSE and was conducting a kind of post-doctoral research. I used to reside at the Passfield Hall, and Khaiyan was also closely associated with Passfield Hall. We dined at the same dining hall on many days and nights and I had engaged in many discussions with him. He was a very kind and caring person – an ideal big brother whom one could safely approach for help.
    After I finished my study from LSE, I lost touch with Khaiyan, but was later pleased to know that he had joined the University of Durham as a lecturer. I was also following his progress.
    After many years I contacted Khaiyam through email. I had then just completed my Master of Studies from Cambridge University. Khaiyan easily recognised me and was very pleased to know what I have achieved academically and professionally. I then spoke to him over the phone. He told me that he had moved to the University of Brunel. I asked him whether he still has the beard that I saw when I was at the LSE. He joked that he had, but it had then grown grey! We talked about legal studies at the Durham University. I told him that I was considering doing an MJur at Durham and Khaiyan greatly encouraged me to apply for the course. He also invited me to visit his place. He told me that he might be away for a year on research leave.
    As a person Khaiyan had rare qualities – a nice person with charming personalities. And his demise is a loss to many!

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